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Sculpture cover





November 2014
Vol. 33 No.9

A publication of the
International Sculpture Center
Seattle, Katinka Bock, Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington
by Matthew Kangas
Katinka Bock, (on floor) Eva, 2014, earth and rain water, installation view; and Nasoni, 2014, bronze and stone, 65.4 x 29.5 x 29.5 inIn an important North American debut, German artist Katinka Bock created seven new works for the Henry Art Gallery at the University of Washington, while deputy director Luis Croquer selected six additional pieces dating from 2008 to the present. The 1927 Carl Gould-designed Art Moderne building, the first art museum in the state of Washington, was a fitting site for Bock because her eccentric, post-Minimalist interventions are best seen in such traditional, not to say historic, architectural settings. This particular building has also hosted numerous other international and American sculptors, notably James Turrell whose Light Reign became a permanent installation adjacent to the building in 2003. Outwardly, this was good company for Bock because each of her works seemed to pay homage to a different artist, including Joseph Beuys, Carl Andre, Richard Serra, and others, most of whom are mentioned in catalogue essays by Croquer and French curator Marie-Celeste Burnichon.....see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Katinka Bock, (on floor) Eva, 2014, earth and rain water, installation view; and Nasoni, 2014, bronze and stone, 65.4 x 29.5 x 29.5 in
Fresno, California, Ed Gillum, 1821 Gallery
by Dan Nadaner
Ed Gillum, Juddstermann, 2013. Stainless steel, glass, and plywood, 48 in. long.
Ed Gillum’s recent work combines various artifacts to create models of a post-Baudrillardian universe, in which the world of mass-produced simulacra and the authentically personal live together. Collected in the aptly titled “Chance Encounters,” these works began with the discovery and repurposing of stainless steel sheets. Cut by a computer-controlled water jet cutter, the new shapes evoke objects of the industrial age as well as electronic circuit plates. Gillum assembles worlds from these sheets and often puts those worlds under wraps. In Pommodoro, Juddstermann, and Mattamarth, forms recalling buildings, minimal sculpture, and semiconductors are presented under the cover of broad sheets of molded glass. In Matta­marth, a flat silhouette of a house stands vertically on a table, with a steel sheet lying flat in front. Small, house-like plaster objects are set within the sheet, and the entire sheet is draped in glass......see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Ed Gillum, Juddstermann, 2013. Stainless steel, glass, and plywood, 48 in. long.
Atlanta, Amy Pleasant, Whitespace Gallery
by Dorothy Joiner
Amy Pleasant, installation view of “re / form,” 2014.
Personal but at the same time universal, Amy Pleasant’s exhibition “re / form” was conceived with the Whitespace Gallery in mind. The two rooms of this converted coach house retain vestiges of their history—herringbone brick floors, a few words scribbled years ago on the wooden walls. Echoing the historical redolence, “re / form” represented Pleasant’s search through her own past—a kind of personal archaeological “dig” and individual quest that inevitably took on more universal implications....see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Amy Pleasant, installation view of “re / form,” 2014. .
Boston, Roberley Bell, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum
by Marty Carlock
Roberley Bell, The Shape of the Afternoon, 2014. Mixed media,.Conflate the styles of Henry Moore, Jean Arp, and Dr. Seuss, stir in California slickness and cartoon colors, and you get Roberley Bell’s The Shape of the Afternoon, which occupied the deCordova’s rooftop with a visionary garden. The cheekiness of Bell’s ideas can’t fail to evoke a smile. A blue blob with an orange lid looks like a shoe; a pink one looks like a Schmoo (does anybody remember Schmoos?). The pink Schmoo, called For HM, for now, pays homage to Henry Moore—inspired by one of his reclining figures, it would seem. It’s not immediately apparent that Bell is a passionate gardener, though she is, or that this work comments on the human habit of trying to impose our own predilections and notions of order on the impulses of wild nature....see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Roberley Bell, The Shape of the Afternoon, 2014. Mixed media,.
New York, Isa Genzken, Museum of Modern Art
by Elaine A. King
Installation view of “Isa Genzken: Retrospective,” 2013–14Isa Genzken’s recent retrospective, featuring a complex mixture of things with resonating presence, provided a 180-degree exodus from participatory art and its aim of eliminating the artist. While Genzken’s work is neither imposing nor necessarily spectacular, it is very contemporary. As the show unfolded, viewers witnessed Genzken’s ongoing creation of a new language of found objects. The 150 works on view spanned 40 years, and though sculpture dominated, paintings, photographs, collages, drawings, artist’s books, and films, were also included. Genzken’s bricolage accretions are inspired by a lifetime of experiences. For this child of postwar Germany, alienation, destruction, and reconstruction are natural, and commonplace, themes. Like the work of Franz West, Genzken’s brimming assemblages and installations straddle the line between the solemn and the absurd....see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Installation view of “Isa Genzken: Retrospective,” 2013–14
New York, Reinhard Mucha, Luhring Augustine Gallery
by Michaël Amy
Reinhard Mucha, Die Deutsche Frage / Dornap, For Philip Nelson, 2007. 2-part work.?(Freestanding): wood, float glass, hardboard, oil paint print on bituminized felt base, 4 wooden footstools, 4 cardboard suitcases, leather cardboard, and metal, 71.9 x 30.3 x 20.5 in.; (on wall): aluminum, float glass, enamel, oil paint print on bituminized felt base, hardboard, and wood, 70 x 236.1 x 21.1 inAllow me to spread my cards on the table. I consider Reinhard Mucha to be among our most impressive contemporary sculptors. I first encountered one of his works about 30 years ago, and that experience has stayed with me ever since—despite seeing truckloads of contemporary art and the fact that this first impression could not be confirmed through subsequent sightings. Mucha’s sculptures are hardly ever shown outside of Germany, because, as he told me when we met unexpectedly at his New York gallery, he works slowly, with quiet deliberation; dealers and collectors need to be patient. The rewards, however, are worth the wait. The fact that I remember the quiet majesty of one work seen so long ago, testifies to the lasting power of Mucha’s vision. There was nothing loud or sensational about that assemblage, though it was extraordinary....see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Reinhard Mucha, Die Deutsche Frage / Dornap, For Philip Nelson, 2007. 2-part work.?(Freestanding): wood, float glass, hardboard, oil paint print on bituminized felt base, 4 wooden footstools, 4 cardboard suitcases, leather cardboard, and metal, 71.9 x 30.3 x 20.5 in.; (on wall): aluminum, float glass, enamel, oil paint print on bituminized felt base, hardboard, and wood, 70 x 236.1 x 21.1 in.
Pittsburgh, Erwin Redl, Wood Street Galleries
by Elaine A. King
Erwin Redl, Twists and Turns, 2014. Plexiglas and lasers, dimensions variableThe wide-ranging exhibitions at Wood Street Galleries are consistently inventive in their focus on n ew media art. Curator Murray Horne presents stimulating digital, virtual, video, and interactive art, as well as installations. Austrian artist Erwin Redl’s recent “Structures of Time and Space” featured two installations—Twists and Turns and Speed Shift—each one yielding a rousing display. This was Redl’s second appearance at Wood Street; in 2003, he fashioned a large-scale, exterior commission for “After Image,” an exhibition that included works by Jim Campbell and Leo Villareal. Redl, who is known for his use of LEDs, shares a kinship with Keith Sonnier and Robert Irwin in his ability to activate gallery space.....see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Erwin Redl, Twists and Turns, 2014. Plexiglas and lasers, dimensions variable.
West Rutland, Vermont, “Historical Markers”, The Carving Studio and Sculpture Center
by B. Amore
Rick Rothrock, Petitus Fugo, 2013. Danby marble and granite, 9 x 5 x 1 ft. Both from “Historical Markers.”?The Carving Studio and Sculpture Center Industry and art make for fascinating bedfellows. “Historical Markers,” part of SculptFest 2013, was installed at the Carving Studio and Sculpture Center, a model repurposing of a post-industrial facility as an art park and working sculpture studio. The land has been quarried since the 1830s, and the Gawet Marble Company still uses a portion of the 170-acre site. Curator Phil Whitman, who remembers his early childhood experiences of historical sites, used that sense of living history as an inspiration for his exhibition. Working amid relics collected over the course of 180 years, nine participating sculptors produced works that complemented the site in daring and exquisite ways. Ashley Goodwin’s The Immortal, like a contemporary Sisyphus, bowed under his burden of a hand-hewn marble block. Goodwin designed the quarryman’s body in unfired clay laid over a wood and steel armature with the express intent that the clay would crack and decompose, leaving the skeleton to sustain the stone. .....see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Rick Rothrock, Petitus Fugo, 2013. Danby marble and granite, 9 x 5 x 1 ft. Both from “Historical Markers.”?.
Buenos Aires, Elena Dahn, Del Infinito Gallery
by Maria Carolina Baulo
Elena Dahn, Untitled, 2014. Plaster, rope, and watercolor paper, dimensions variableDel Infinito Gallery opened its 2014 season with a show of works by Elena Dahn, an artist who uses plaster and silicone to create abstract volumes that occupy both walls and floors. Simple materials and an economy of resources are the building blocks of a language that she uses to articulate a nonfigurative, yet unconventionally narrative register, appealing to the minimal without being Minimalist while focusing on organic shapes. Her subjectivity is always present even when she consciously seeks a certain ambiguity and neutrality in her forms. There’s also a strong sexual motif, which adds sensuality to her work. Dahn’s works have become increasingly disturbing over the years—deeper, more abstract, and more synthetic, they never compromise a complexity that allows for multiple interpretations. She forces her materials, tests their flexibility, and manages to take advantage of a tradition that breaks formal structure while still maintaining a sense of harmony.....see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Elena Dahn, Untitled, 2014. Plaster, rope, and watercolor paper, dimensions variable.
Vancouver, Douglas Coupland, Vancouver Art Gallery
by Daneva Dansby
Douglas Coupland, Nests (School Spirit) and Generation X, 2005. Chewed-up books, branches, and hornets’ nests, installation viewDouglas Coupland’s first solo museum show, “everywhere is anywhere is anything is everything,” took viewers through a sprawling cultural foray into today’s schizoid society. Coupland’s early schooling included a diploma in sculpture, and this influence is felt throughout the show. With Gumhead—a seven-foot-tall outdoor bust of Coupland’s head covered in gum that greeted visitors—and The Brain—a hoarder’s dream that crowned the show’s proceedings—this exhibition gave the feeling of “living in Doug’s world now” (an omniscient statement uttered by Coupland’s incarnate character in his novel JPod). Coupland’s sculptures frequently use everyday objects either refashioned into new designs or simply displayed as art objects in their own right. Several of his installations extend from models, building blocks, and toy kits reconfigured into new environments. Coupland is a keen observer, and a lot of these works point to deeper philosophical considerations on the merit of juxtaposition alone. In the section of the show titled “Secret Handshake” (a look into Canadian identity), typical items of nationalistic import—dreamcatchers, lumber-jack flannel, hockey memorabilia, plywood siding—take on new forms as utilitarian design objects, including sofas, a hutch, and a coffee table....see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Douglas Coupland, Nests (School Spirit) and Generation X, 2005. Chewed-up books, branches, and hornets’ nests, installation view.
Frankfurt, Erwin Wurm, Städel Museum
by Gary Pearson
Erwin Wurm, Theory of Paint­ing, 2007/2014. Installation views of 3 “One Minute Sculptures.”“Erwin Wurm: One Minute Sculp­tures,” curated by Martin Engler, head of the Städel Museum’s contemporary art collection, consisted of a survey of older works and new works created specifically for the Städel collection. Wurm’s ongoing “One Minute Sculptures” series began in the late 1990s, and examples range from Estimating the Wood Mass (1996) to Theory of Painting (2007), made from wood, paint, permanent marker, and absorbent cloth. The show also featured a series of color photographs and videos documenting previous work. Although Wurm’s practice is diverse, he considers himself a sculptor, and his work has consistently investigated sculptural form and its spatial, material, figural, abstract, and cultural manifestations and significations. The interactive component of the “One Minute Sculptures” aligns the series to a history that includes work by such artists as Hélio Oiticica, Lucy Orta, and Franz West, among others......see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Erwin Wurm, Theory of Paint­ing, 2007/2014. Installation views of 3 “One Minute Sculptures.”

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