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April 2017
Vol. 36 No. 3

A publication of the
International Sculpture Center

This selection of shows has been curated by Sculpture magazine editorial staff and includes just a few of the great shows around the world.

21er Haus - Vienna: Franz West- ARTISTCLUB
Through April 23, 2017
West, Stolen Fantasy Coming out of a powerful 1960s performance scene led by the Viennese Actionists, West developed an early interest in the potential of objects to trigger an array of psychological states and experiences. Not only did he recast the artwork as a participatory proposition with his biomorphic and prosthetic manipulations designed to be worn and moved, but he also reconceived the act of creation, transforming it into an ongoing collaborative process involving both artists and viewers. In 1999, West initiated the ARTISTCLUB, a radical challenge to the idea of the independent artwork and its singular creator, and though it didn’t come to full fruition in his lifetime, this show gives a sense of its playful, subversive spirit. Made by 36 different artists working in tandem with West, featured works—including the ambitious Extroversion, for the 2011 Venice Biennale—demonstrate the principles of dialogic making. This ideal of collaboration runs on the energy of continual flux—everything can be upended, and by anyone. 21er Haus honors that principle by offering a Heimo Zobernig/West work as an open stage for participation and inviting visitors to interact with the objects.

Web site www.21erhaus.at


Franz West, Stolen Fantasy.
Arter- Instanbul: Jake and Dinos Chapman
Through May 7, 2017
Chapman, Kino Klub II Perpetrators of shock and scandal since 1990, the Chapmans continue to mine the depths of depravity. From sexually reconfigured mannequins to tribal sculptures serving the cult of the Golden Arches, their works unmask the savage face of contemporary culture. “In the Realm of the Senseless,” their first solo exhibition in Turkey, features a selection of wellknown and new works, including the largest selection yet assembled of the “Hell” series. Alternately naïve, sarcastic, funny, and horrifying, works such as Unhappy Feet, Fucking Dinosaurs, and The Sum of All Evil force us to examine the debased condition of our political, social, and moral present. From extinction and environmental depredation to exploitation in the name of consumption and human perversions of every description, the result is a deeply complex, intelligent, and intense vision of morass, a mirror image of a twisted zeitgeist.

Web site www.arter.org.tr

Jake and Dinos Chapman, Kino Klub II.
Block Museum, Northwestern University- Evanston, Illinois: Kader Attia
Through April 16, 2017
Attia, Les blessures sont la Laying bare questions of community, diversity, exile, and the clash of cultures, Attia’s installations frequently plunge viewers into confrontational environments of mental and/or physical discomfort. “Reflecting Memory” features a group of new works based in part on the collections of Northwestern’s Herskovits Library of African Studies. Extending his preoccupation with the idea of repair—both physical and psychological—as it applies to individuals and societies, these works once again emphasize the healing and reparatory aspects of the process, as opposed to its cooptation for darker purposes of control. Drawing resonant parallels between phantom limb sensations and traumatic memories passed down through generations, this re-examination of the legacies of slavery and xenophobia strikes close to home, reminding U.S. viewers that division and hardened conflict aren’t limited to other parts of the world—psychopathology and its rhetoric of justification as well as the repressed wounds of colonialism run just as deeply through our own past and present.

Web site www.blockmuseum.northwestern.edu

Kader Attia, Les blessures sont lá.

Fondazione Prada- Venice: Pamela Rosenkranz
Through May 14, 2017
Rosenkranz, Our Product Rosenkranz’s sculptures, installations, and paintings raise fundamental questions about what it means to be human in today’s world. Drawing on extensive research, she seeks out the material realities behind the cultural constructions posited by philosophy, religion, medicine, and marketing. Rational to the extreme, she approaches the body as a tool to investigate accepted accounts of our being in both its physical and psychological aspects—everything from blushing (self-induced via Viagra) to the Pavlovian response sparked by certain flesh tones (separated from bodies). Our Product, her tour-deforce installation at the 2015 Venice Biennale, exposed the hard-wired biological mechanisms that have shaped time-honored aesthetic tenets and now guide the shrewdest advertising strategems. Her new work, Infection, appears to be nothing more than a giant pile of sand, but it puts visitors at the mercy of unconscious urges controlled by a neuroactive parasite (present in humans worldwide). Impregnated with the fragrance of synthetic cat phero - mones (cats are the principal host of Toxoplasma gondii), the sand activates an attraction impulse, dictating movement and behavior. Infection may be insidious, but it reflects the truth of a “human-indifferent universe,” one where treasured markers of our individuality, indeed of our humanity, mean nothing.

Web site www.fondazioneprada.org

Pamela Rosenkranz, Our Product.
Hammer Museum- Los Angeles: Kevin Beasley
Through April 23, 2017
Beasley, Chairs of the ministers of defense Beasley’s raw and performative work explores the physical materiality and cultural connotations of objects and sounds. A hybrid of assemblage and process art, his sculptures bind personal ephemera such as discarded clothes and studio debris into archaeological aggregations held together with resin and polyurethane. Working only until the resin hardens, he strikes a balance between the inherent properties of the materials and the finished forms, which preserve embedded artifacts intact. Already referencing an absent human presence, these works frequently act as acoustic mirrors, mute in themselves but reflecting ambient and recorded sound. Though we might recognize what we see (house dresses, Air Jordans, bandanas) and hear (samples from dead rappers), these bits have been run through the mill of symbolism to transcend familiar surface identity; distilled and refined, they begin to echo a visual language that we still understand today, albeit remotely. Chair of the Ministers of Defense, Beasley’s new project, forces the issue, translating a historic power structure into contemporary parlance. In this remixed cooptation, Bernini’s Chair of St. Peter (a reliquary for the “original” seat of Vatican legitimacy) grounds another iconic image, morphing into the wicker “peacock” chair of Black Panther Party founder Huey P. Newton, where he was photo - graphed sitting in state with a shotgun in one hand and a spear in the other. Surrounded by ghostly proxies of Bernini’s church fathers, Beasley’s empty cathedra marks the crossroads where promises of protection and redemption battle acts of ignorance and violence.

Web site www.hammer.ucla.edu

Kevin Beasley, Chair of the Ministers of Defense.
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden- Washington, DC: Yayoi Kusama
Through May 14, 2017
Kusama, Infinity Mirrored Room An early advocate of social transformation through happenings, performances, and installations, Kusama soon rose to the forefront of Pop art with soft sculptures and clothes featuring food-based imagery, but she is best-known for her room-size installations covered in eye-popping, psychedelic patterns that unfold in seemingly boundless optical confusion. Immersed in obsession and neurotic escapism, these environments attempt to share a private psychic world, luring viewers into mesmerizing labyrinths of kaleidoscopic dots, nets, and infinitely mirrored spaces. “Infinity Mirrors,” which features six multi-reflective environments in addition to two large-scale installations and key sculptures and two-dimensional works, explores five decades of phenomenological distortion. Vivid, playful, and somewhat claustrophobic, these insider “outsider” works make what could be traumatic palatable, and even desirable.

Web site www.hirshhorn.si.edu


Yayoi Kusama, Infinity Mirrored Room
Museu de Serralves - Porto, Portugal: Philippe Parreno
Through May 7, 2017
Parreno, Quasi Objects Working across film, video, sculpture, sound, performance, and information technology, Parreno explores the borders between reality and fiction through choreographed spaces that redefine the art experience. “A Time Coloured Space”—a quasi-retrospective of his most emblematic works, including Speech Bubbles (heliumfilled balloons devoid of words), Fraught Times (aluminum sculptures that double as snow-covered Christmas trees for one month every year), and With a Rhythmic Instinction to be Able to Travel Beyond Existing Forces of Life (a perpetual danse macabre controlled by an organic cellular system)— is no exception. More like a coherent “object” than a collection of distinct works, the show unfolds according to the structure of a fugue— what matters is not the pieces themselves, but the rhythm of their appearance across the entire composition. Taking a cue from the semantic play of difference and repetition, each of the show’s 13 rooms is a recurrence of its predecessor, varied only in color. Yet the repeats add up to difference, expressed as an unpredictably variable score. Like Anywhen, Parreno’s recent installation at Turbine Hall, this show functions as an orchestrating automaton, but here the collision of past and future in the space of the present creates the sense of agency, transforming imitation into a new form of invention.

Web site www.serralves.pt

Philippe Parreno, Quasi Objects
Museum Tinguely- Basel: Stephen Cripps
Through May 1, 2018
Cripps, performance at the acme Cripps’s work eludes categorization, just as he intended. Over the course of his brief career (he died in 1982), he built machines and interactive installations in addition to staging pyrotechnical performances. He devised kinetic, mechanical sculptures, created sound works, experimented with film, and produced collages and drawings—often combining all of these practices—in an attempt to capture the fleeting, the provisional, and the experimental. “Performing Machines,” the first major exhibition of his work, offers a fascinating glimpse into his unusual, strangely appointed conceptual world. Cripps’s interest in kineticism, fireworks, new forms of music, and the poetic potential of destruction resulted in radically transgressive, and dangerous, actions that would be unthinkable today, not least a shooting gallery in which visitors were invited to take aim at a cymbal, a xylophone, and other sound-producing objects with a pistol.

Web site http://www.tinguely.ch

Stephen Cripps, Performance at the Acme.
Pérez Art Museum- Miami: Sarah Oppenheimer
Through April 30, 2017
Oppemheimer, S-281913 Oppenheimer rethinks and re-invents architecture’s most overlooked elements— planes and holes—in order to investigate how spaces shape behavior and how behavior can, in turn, impact inhabited space. In Contained, for instance, she covered the walls of a gallery with cardboard cladding that viewers could unfold to create a variety of configurations. Watching as habits of interaction took shape, she changed the space and altered her subjects’ behavior yet again. Her interpretation of the human sciences through an aesthetic lens results in a genuinely interactive approach to sculpture and installation (not just an expressed interest in participation): viewers interact with a given work, and their interactions become the input for Oppenheimer’s ever-evolving sculptural sensibility. Her new installation at PAMM, S-281913, continues this psychological and behavioral experimentation while intensifying the sensorial dynamics through the reflectivity and passage of light. (Another new work, S-337473, is on view at the Wexner Center for the Arts through April 16 .)

Web site www.pamm.org

Sarah Oppenheimer, S-281913.
Turner Contemporary- Margate, U.K.: Kashif Nadim Chaudry
Through April 23, 2017
Chaudry, the three gracesChaudry makes lavish use of fabric, stitching, and decoration in his extravagant installations. Drawing inspiration from disparate contexts— everything from Elizabethan costume, Islamic and Gothic architecture, and Catholic church furnishings to contemporary fashion and Internet memes, he replaces categorization and order with ambiguity and a glorious messiness. Over-embellishment, an expression of power at the heart of disparate aesthetic vocabularies, serves as his overriding meta - phor. But he also sees the potential for beauty to turn ugly: just as authoritative display can spill into acts of terror and repression, opulence and excess can descend into disease and impotence. His new commission, The Three Graces, created in collaboration with the 19 artists of the Turner Contemporary Studio Group, tempers the serious with the ridiculous, stirring together prehistoric religion, Classical Greece, and Islam with a dash of Alexander McQueen.

Web site www.turnercontemporary.org

Kashif Nadim Chaudry, The Three Graces

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