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Sculpture cover




Nov 2017
Vol. 36 No. 9

A publication of the
International Sculpture Center
Kassel and Munster: Documenta 14 - Skulptur Projekte Münster
by Laura Roulet
Aram Bartholl, 5V, 2017. Summer 2017 marked an art world trifecta, the Venice Biennale coinciding with Documenta (held every five years) and Skulptur Projekte Münster (held every 10 years). In Kassel and Münster, what began as modest municipal undertakings to reconnect postwar Germany with the global art community have become internationally recognized for their influence. Sources of great civic pride, these shows depart from Venice and the art fair model with their refreshing non-commercial slant. As British artist Jeremy Deller commented to The Art Newspaper, "There are no yachts in Münster, and that's important." First launched in 1977 by Klaus Bussmann and Kasper König, Skulptur Projekte Münster (SPM) has become a bellwether of public sculpture. The 10-year intervals allow for "longterm study that consistently reflects the current of a particular time," in the words of 2007 curator Brigitte Franzen. Its un-themed curatorial approach calls for invited artists to visit the town and submit site-specific proposals. With each iteration, some finished projects remain. ...see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Aram Bartholl, 5V, 2017. Campfire, wood, steel, thermoelectric generator, cables, and electronics. From Skulptur Projekte Münster.
Rochester, Michigan: Cody VanderKaay - Oakland University Art Gallery
by Julie Wills
Cody
VanderKaay, Ball Drop, 2017. The best group shows spark conversations between artworks, revealing new dimensions and offering fresh insights. "/spek-tr m/ variance of sculpture and form," which showcased works by many of Kansas City's best-known sculptors, did just that. Studios Inc is a nonprofit studio complex and residency program located just east of KC's Crossroads Arts District. It maintains a collection consisting of works donated by resident artists as a condition of their three-year tenure. Studios Inc's associate director, Robert Gann, drew from these holdings for "/spektr m/." A Minimalist aesthetic dominated the show, many works evidencing an aura of quiet self-containment and an attraction to domestic and landscape references. All of the featured artists make the selection of materials a key part of their work. May Tveit's chosen material is wheat straw, bundled into prickly blocks and encased in solid hues of plastic hard-coat paint. Frosted Flakes (2009), a wallmounted display of three blocks painted in blue and yellow, exudes an attitude of renegade Mini - malism. The color both muffles and emphasizes the work's relationship to the cereal-producing agrarian landscape around Kansas City. ...see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Cody VanderKaay, Ball Drop, 2017. Material studies, finished artwork, heirlooms, ephemera, and mixed media, 96 x 288 x 5 in.
Kansas City: "/spek-tr m/ variance of sculpture and form" - Studios Inc
by Alice Thorson
Davin Watne, Life is a Collision, 2008.The best group shows spark conversations between artworks, revealing new dimensions and offering fresh insights. "/spek-tr m/ variance of sculpture and form," which showcased works by many of Kansas City's best-known sculptors, did just that. Studios Inc is a nonprofit studio complex and residency program located just east of KC's Crossroads Arts District. It maintains a collection consisting of works donated by resident artists as a condition of their three-year tenure. Studios Inc's associate director, Robert Gann, drew from these holdings for "/spektr m/." A Minimalist aesthetic dominated the show, many works evidencing an aura of quiet self-containment and an attraction to domestic and landscape references ...see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Davin Watne, Life is a Collision, 2008. Taxidermy mount and mirrors, dimensions variable. From "/spek-tr m/."
Charlottetown Prince Edward Island, Canada: Rachel Beach - Confederation Centre of the Arts
by Ray Cronin
Rachel Beach, installation view of
Much discussion about the history of 20th-century sculpture has focused on its emergence from under the shadow of painting. With Minimalism's return to the object, the conversation with painting suddenly seemed irrelevant. Yet, as with so much in art, conversations never truly end, they evolve and spiral in new directions. The work of Brooklyn artist Rachel Beach appears, at first glance, to be a manner of painting in threedimensional space. But her recent exhibition, "Mid-Sentence," which I first saw in Halifax at the Saint Mary's University Art Gallery, offered a conversation about paintings as objects, and the history it cited is, of necessity, more complex than the translation of Modernist ideas from two to three dimensions, a strategy that marked so much sculpture from the first half of the 20th century...see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Rachel Beach, installation view of "Mid-Sentence," 2016.
Athens, Greece: Documenta 14
by Thalia Vrachopoulos
Aboubakar Fofana,
Ka touba Farafina yé (Africa blessing),
2017. At the opening press conference of Documenta 14, "Learning From Athens," artistic director Adam Szymczyk stated, "The great lesson is that there are no lessons." These elusive words may well have been a disclaimer for an exhibition that rambled on without aim. Such large events are difficult to manage in general, but Documenta's Athens endeavor required viewers to accept much of the responsibility for realizing the show's potential and to make a sizable time commitment to text-based art. Though conceived as a multi-disciplinary project geared, one would think, to the art-loving public in the age of pluralism, the show's goals were so abstruse as to require a high level of expertise...see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Aboubakar Fofana, Ka touba Farafina yé (Africa blessing), 2017. Both from Documenta 14.

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