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Randy Gachet



Phone: 205-525-9241
Email: rgachet@asfa.k12.al.us

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         Randy Gachet earned a BFA, concentrating in sculpture, from Birmingham Southern College in 1987. Currently, He teaches visual art at the Alabama School of Fine Arts in Birmingham . Gachet’s work is consistently exhibited in galleries, non- profit spaces and museums throughout Alabama, as well as, gallery representation in Seattle, Washington and Harbert Michigan . His sculpture has been included in SECCA's 2007 Homegrown Southeast exhibition and the 2000 Red Clay Survey: Seventh Biennial of Contemporary Southern Art at the HUntsville Museum of Art. Awards received include merit awards at the 2004 Kentuck Arts Festival and Magic City Art Connection, the Spirit of the South Award from the 2004 Art with a Southern Drawl juried exhibition at the University of Mobile and an award of merit from the 2000 Red Clay Survey at the Huntsville Museum of Art. His work can be found in public and corporate collections, including the Southern Environmental Center in Birmingham and in private collections across the country.

         Since 1996 I have focused on realizing sculptures and installations which deal with the retrieval and transformation of rubber tire remnants and other jettisoned material found on the freeways and highways that course through the Birmingham area. The perpetual whir and rush of semi trucks and automobiles implicate the voracious engines of production and consumption that hurtle them by, as I scavenge the highway for scattered detritus they leave behind. The crow, a supreme scavenger, figures prominently in this environ where we harvest refuse. The crow’s ability to transform decay into sustenance, provides a metaphor of renewal, my work relates to on a visceral and contextual level. In my process; reclamation and transmutation of highway detritus serve as symbolic, redemptive gestures calling attention to the ubiquitous stuff left behind by a drive thru, drive by culture. Fashioned from the remnants of tire, the crow and other animal forms central to my work simultaneously read as amusing creatures and menacing harbingers. The resulting works provoke a larger question; can art provide an impetus for creative action and collective responsibilty to buffer the impact of enviromental storms brewing.