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Jacquie Germanow

83 Hawthorne St.
Rochester, NY 14610, U.S.A.
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    Fax: 585 232-5169
Email: jacquie@jagvisualart.com
URL: http://www.jagvisualart.com

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I make sculpture that uses material as metaphor. It is the ordinary, the forgotten that draws my eye and moves my hand. Juxtaposing freshly fabricated organic forms with historical remnants (either grown or manufactured) that in some cases are on the edge of existence, begins the magic that draws me down into the creative process.  

 

Seismic activity and growth are the metaphors that guide the evolution of my work. Contemplated on a human scale, these pieces penetrate ancient songs of connection.

 

Each material sings its own energy in these elegiac translations that echo a wry, redemptive humor.  The earthy textures contrast with the liquid glint of glass or metal.

 

Glass begins as clay and is kiln cast in plaster silica molds.  It brings the cleansing, fluid clarity of water or ice to each piece.

 

Stone, the bone of the earth, anchors with a strong, quiet, calm, and is carved to receive.

 

Provoked terrestrial clay; pops and cracks in a geologically characteristic way before being fired to stone. 

 

Copper holds as it conducts. 

 

Bronze transforms to precious. 

 

Iron’s strength supports, imprisons and rusts (bleeds). 

 

Bone is the material of immortality, of what cannot change, and like wood, a message of what remains from the life force.   

 

The engineering of a seemingly impossible combination of materials is a process of many iterations encouraging chance to deliver the sublime, and coaxing one material to key into another so that the work flows. 

  

Ultimately, my work is about making manifest those invisible qualities, those lines of force and gravity that move us toward health.  Perhaps by loving what is almost forgotten, I give credence to memory and heart.

 

In a world that so easily embraces the politics of fear, aggression and isolation, these integrated works of disparate entities point away from destruction and disconnection to the courageous clarity of our rich and abundant natural heritage and our human connection to it.