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July/August 2018
Vol. 37 No. 6

A publication of the
International Sculpture Center
Osaka, Japan: Michio Fukuoka- National Museum of Art, Osaka
by Kazuko Nakane
Michio Fukuoka, Why
Did I Ever Fly?, 1965–66. Plaster, rope,
and hemp, dimensions variable.In a conformist society of sophisticated stylization, the Japanese sculptor Michio Fukuoka stands out as an outcast. A "Sculptor Who No Longer Sculpts," as he's identified by this retrospective, he questions logical frames of mind and, with his keen intuition, is quick to defy them. He favors taking a longer, more difficult road to uncover an imagery determined by hard reflection. It's a luxury, and perhaps a bit indulgent, to be patient enough to discover your own creative voice. One suspects that many artists today would have abandoned the journey long ago. Fukuoka's sculpture (along with his writing) becomes a provocative public statement, a naked personal poetry. At the age of 81, his mind continues to home in on the search for and perfection of an art that can offer a new rhythm of life. ...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Michio Fukuoka, Why Did I Ever Fly?, 1965–66. Plaster, rope, and hemp, dimensions variable.
Palo Alto, California: "Through That Which Is Seen"- Palo Alto Art Center
by Maria Porges
Abigail Goldman,
Mommy Knows Best, 2017. Assorted
plastics and acrylic paint, 4.5 x 3 in.
From “Through That Which Is Seen.” The literal meaning of the word "diorama"-- through that which is seen--served as the title for this exhibition of sculptures and installations by more than a dozen artists. The idea of the diorama explored in the show--as a model, whether miniature or life-size, of anything from a historical event to a species habitat--dates back to the 19th century. In its infancy, it functioned as a kind of pre-cinematic entertainment spectacle, before evolving into a nature/culture educational tool. Many kinds of museums have used dioramas, sometimes as vehicles better suited to propaganda than fact....see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Abigail Goldman, Mommy Knows Best, 2017. Assorted plastics and acrylic paint, 4.5 x 3 in. From "Through That Which Is Seen."
Boston: Jeffrey Schiff- Rafius Fane Gallery
by Suzanne Volmer
Jeffrey Schiff,
Carpet Rubble #2, 2016. Oriental
carpet, rubble, glue, and rubber, 7
x 70 x 46 in."DisInterRuptions," Jeffrey Schiff's recent exhibition, included a selection of floor sculptures (many from the "Carpet Rubble" series), three-dimensional studies, and photo-based wall reliefs from the "Inter rup tions" series. The "Carpet Rubble" works feature chunks of concrete debris re-surfaced with pieces of Oriental rugs. Schiff then works the hybrid forms like large jigsaw puzzle pieces to reconstruct original patterns, restoring what he had temporarily destroyed. These fragmented works, dominated by tones of Indian red and sienna, suggest the dislocations of the current global condition....see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Jeffrey Schiff, Carpet Rubble #2, 2016. Oriental carpet, rubble, glue, and rubber, 7 x 70 x 46 in.
New York: Sheila Hicks- High Line
by Jane Ingram Allen
Sheila Hicks, Hop, Skip,
Jump, and Fly: Escape From Gravity,
2017. Fabric and mixed media, 2
views of installation.In the mid-1970s, Sheila Hicks was considered a heroine of the "new tapestry" movement. For over 50 years, she has stretched the boundaries of fiber as a medium, creating a distinctive body of work that weaves together sculpture, craft, design, and architecture; now at 84, she continues to create innovative, energetic objects and installations that transcend genres and materials while uniting color and structure. Among Hicks's numerous exhibitions and projects over the last year, Hop, Skip, Jump, and Fly: Escape From Gravity, her recent High Line commission, stood out for its powerful understanding of color and space. A massive, multi-part work in myriad colors, the composition followed an almost continuous line for thousands of feet along the High Line path. Hicks began near the 30th Street entrance with a grass-green color that shifted to orange, red, yellow, pink, blue, and many blends in between as it meandered up fences, over rocks, and along sidewalks, interlacing and looping seemingly for miles....see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Sheila Hicks, Hop, Skip, Jump, and Fly: Escape From Gravity, 2017. Fabric and mixed media, 2 views of installation.
New York: Jeanne Silverthorne- MARC STRAUS Gallery
by Jan Riley
Jeanne Silverthorne, Suicidal
Sunflower, 2014. Platinum silicone
rubber, dimensions variable.For nearly three decades, Jeanne Silverthorne has treated the artist's studio and all it encompasses as her subject. The work that gets made there, the furniture and tools, the person who makes the work (herself), and the workings of the artist's body are all represented, along with memories, dreams, and discarded ideas. The other living creatures who share the studio--ants, flies, cater - pillars, moths, and spiders--are present as well. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the end of studio arts as a whole and the impossibility of this mode of expression regaining its former creative validity and vitality in today's world.Her recent exhibition offered viewers a range of genres that were once the primary tools used by studio artists to explore the world and their reactions to it. The still-life was represented by floral arrangements, lamps, chairs, and packing boxes. The self-portrait was also present, most powerfully in Suicidal Sunflower (2014) in which a sunflower hangs from the cord of a work light, its desiccated roots draped over a packing crate. Self-Portrait as a Fly With Glasses (2017) consists of a largerthan- life-size fly lying on its belly with its legs splayed out behind and its broken antennae hanging over a pair of black glasses...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Jeanne Silverthorne, Suicidal Sunflower, 2014. Platinum silicone rubber, dimensions variable.
Pittsburgh: "New Installations: 40th Year"- Mattress Factory
by Elaine A. King
Meg Webster, Solar Grow
Room, 2017. Plywood, soil, perlite,
plants, steel, Mylar, LED grow lights,
and off-grid solar-powered electrical
system, installation view.The Mattress Factory has been commissioning new installations since 1977. Over those four decades, an estimated 800 artists from around the world, including Janine Antoni, Vito Acconci, Ann Hamilton, Yayoi Kusama, Tony Oursler, Kiki Smith, Bill Woodrow, and noted regional artists Kim Beck, Joe Mannino, Kathleen Montgomery, Thaddeus Mosley, and Diane Samuels, have constructed unique works. In addition to temporary installations, the MF has also amassed a sizeable collection of permanent site-specific works, including James Turrell's recent gift of a customdesigned Skyspace...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Meg Webster, Solar Grow Room, 2017. Plywood, soil, perlite, plants, steel, Mylar, LED grow lights, and off-grid solar-powered electrical system, installation view.
Calgary, Alberta, Canada: Alana Bartol- TRUCK Contemporary Art in Calgary
by Maeve Hanna
Alana Bartol, installation view
of “In Blood and Bone,” with (center)
Orphan Well Adoption Agency
Office, 2017.A small, one-room structure built from salvaged wood filled the center of the gallery at TRUCK. Apparently an office, it contained a desk, a recycling bin, a fake plant, and a clock, whose minute and hour hands never moved. The desk was neatly arranged with papers and files, just like any regular office desk. The walls were decorated with photographs of oil derricks, their mechanisms caught mid-movement, bobbing toward the ground to source the black gold that made Alberta richThis sculptural installation-cumworkspace-- an Orphan Well Adoption Agency (OWAA)--formed the centerpiece of Alana Bartol's exhibition "In Blood and Bone." After the collapse of the Alberta oil industry over the last few years, many wells, which for decades had been sourcing one of the province's most lucrative exports, were abandoned and left standing as ghostly relics of a short-sighted economic enterprise...see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Alana Bartol, installation view of "In Blood and Bone," with (center) Orphan Well Adoption Agency Office, 2017.
Margate, U.K.: Jean Arp- Turner Contemporary
by Ina Cole

Jean Arp, Self-Dissolving Shell, 1936.
Limestone, 26 x 41 x 22 cm."Arp: The Poetry of Forms," the first U.K. museum exhibition of Jean (Hans) Arp's work since 1966, gave viewers fresh insights into this pioneer of chance whose serendipitous configurations personify the core precept of Dada practice--that of the gratuitous creative act. Through - out his life, Arp correlated visual work and poetry, and this facet of his practice was explored through 70 sculptures and reliefs, which eventually fused with his use of words to result in lyrical compositions imbued with undeniable beauty. Arp played a pivotal role in some of the 20th century's most significant movements, including Sur realism and Constructivism. In 1916, he became one of the original Zürich Dadaists (his bilingual ability helped unite French- and German-speaking members)....see the entire review in the print version of July/August's Sculpture magazine.

Jean Arp, Self-Dissolving Shell, 1936. Limestone, 26 x 41 x 22 cm.


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