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November 2018
Vol. 37 No. 9

A publication of the
International Sculpture Center
Los Angeles: Senga Nengudi - Art + Practice
by Kay Whitney
Senga Nengudi, performance with
R.S.V.P., 1976.As far as symbolism is concerned, certain materials arrive ready-made, freighted with meaning. The protean sculptor/dancer Senga Nengudi, a major influence on Los Angeles's African American art scene of the '70s and '80s, employs a material whose sole function is to be in contact with the female body. In her R.S.V.P. works, she uses pantyhose as a symbol of the female persona: capacious, resilient, able to stretch and come back into shape. The fleshtone colors of the material draw out such difficult and fundamental aspects of identity as race, gender, sexuality, and the physical characteristics of the female body. By collecting pantyhose donated by friends and bought from thrift shops, Nengudi accesses what she calls the "residual energy of what it means for a woman to wear these garments." ...see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Senga Nengudi, performance with R.S.V.P., 1976.
Washington, DC: Martha Jackson Jarvis - Dumbarton Oaks
by Cathryn Keller
Martha Jackson Jarvis, Reclama -
tion in Bamboo, 2018. Bamboo,
string, rubber hose, copper, and
paint, installation view. A perfect match of artist and venue, "Outside/IN" (whose outdoor component remains open until December 16) shines an overdue spotlight on a substantial body of work by Washing ton, DC, sculptor Martha Jackson Jarvis, while illuminating the collections that led to the creation of this Harvard research center as a "home of the humanities." The exhibition is the fifth in a series of contemporary art installations designed to provoke fresh interpretations of Dumbarton Oaks' famous gardens and tightly focused museum--the public faces of a scholarly paradise. The mixed-media works on view in the garden include 20 sculptures and assemblages made of wood, wisteria vines, sumac, stone, glass, and concrete. Inside, a dozen works on paper, composed of botanical images (both drawn and digital), black walnut ink, and other earthy pigments, are juxtaposed with objects selected from the renowned Byzantine and Pre-Colum bian collections, locating Jarvis's work in relation to much older traditions...see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Martha Jackson Jarvis, Reclama - tion in Bamboo, 2018. Bamboo, string, rubber hose, copper, and paint, installation view.
Detroit: Manal Shoukair - Shylo Arts
by Steve Panton
Manal Shoukair, Elevate, 2018. Fiber,
installation view.Visitors to Shylo Arts rapidly gain an idea of the building's former uses. Signage for the Shiloh Tabernacle Church of God in Christ is still prominently in place, and bifur - cating male/female entrance paths point to the building's original incarnation as a synagogue. It is an unlikely location for an art space, tucked away in a sparsely populated neighborhood obscurely positioned between a freeway and the fringes of Detroit's solidly middle-class University District. But if visitors may be unfamiliar with this part of the city, they will surely arrive knowing something of the demographic shifts behind the history and current dilapidated state of this modest structure...see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Manal Shoukair, Elevate, 2018. Fiber, installation view.
Brooklyn, New York: Sook Jin Jo - Black & White Gallery/Project Space
by Jonathan Goodman
Sook Jin Jo, Shanghai Black #8, 2014.
Chinese ink, acrylic, oil, found fragments,
and plywood, 43.3 x 37.4
x 3.5 in.Born in Korea, Sook Jin Jo has lived and worked in New York for decades; it is hard to see her as anything other than a New York artist. She would likely agree with this, though she visits Asia regularly--indeed, the works in this show came from a 2014 residency in Shanghai. Occupying a middle ground between two and three dimensions, these paintings/assemblages perhaps also describe a balance between Asian and Western influences. Jo is best known for her installations of found fragmented furniture, but these works occupy the wall, sometimes reaching out more than a few inches toward the viewer. The relief quality maintains Jo's interest in sculptural process, even as she aligns with painting...see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Sook Jin Jo, Shanghai Black #8, 2014. Chinese ink, acrylic, oil, found fragments, and plywood, 43.3 x 37.4 x 3.5 in.
New York: Ursula von Rydingsvard - Galerie Lelong & Co.
by Jan Garden Castro
Ursula von Rydingsvard, installation
view of TORN, 2018.Ursula von Rydingsvard is finding new ways to deepen her three-dimensional spaces: the cavities and protuberances in her recent works recall beaks, balls, mouths, and armpits-- irregular human and animal body parts that nevertheless seem familiar. Niches and caverns open out or suck you in; appendages curve precipitously around the main body. These forms could be portraits of myths we're in the middle of living. The large-scale, rough-hewn cedar forms featured in her recent exhibition "TORN" nod to her Polish- Ukrainian heritage and to histories of suffering worldwide. von Rydings - vard gives her works mostly Polish names and leaves it to viewers to decode what they have to say. The bronze Z BOKU memorializes her labor-intensive cedar construction process. Its back area has a kind of tail and hind legs; many sharp ridges ride up its sides; a top ridge is laced with small irregular openings that let in light. The bronze patina has hues of gold, copper, and red that add to the depth of its faceted surface...see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Ursula von Rydingsvard, installation view of "TORN," 2018.
Helsinki: Matthew Cowan - Photographic Gallery Hippolyte
by John Gayer
Matthew Cowan,
installation views of In "para field notes," Matthew Cowan expands on a highly intriguing program that examines regional customs and folklore through art. His previous projects have included "Walk on Roses and Forget-me-nots," a survey of courtship rituals mounted in Braunschweig, Germany, and Wude - wasa, an exploration of the wild-man archetype that he encountered while investigating European carnival traditions in England. Here, in what has been described as a notebook of artistic research, he induced consideration of the past and present, rural and urban spheres; and by underscoring the significance of butter, he linked Finland, Ireland, and Germany with his native New Zealand. Stepping into the exhibition subjected city-dwelling viewers to a potent sense of disjuncture...see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Matthew Cowan, installation views of "para field notes," 2018.
DISPATCH: New York: Danh Vo - Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
by Susan Canning
Danh Vo, She was more like
a beauty queen from a movie scene,
2009. Mixed media, 96.5 x 54.5 cm.The Guggenheim proved a fitting setting for this mid-career survey of Danh Vo, its spiraling ramp and multileveled galleries complimenting the layered complexity that characterizes Vo's examination of the intersection between private experience and broader social constructions of identity, colonialism, religion, war, and capitalism. Vo is a master at staging what he terms "tiny diasporas of a person's life"--arrangements of mundane, ordinary objects that gain meaning through presentation, attribution, and association. Photo - graphs, letters, and objects, meant to be examined up close in vitrines, were juxtaposed with numerous items installed along the ramp and in galleries and alcoves, including a Mercedes-Benz engine, household appliances, a typewriter, chandeliers, cardboard boxes, and pieces of sculpture, some enclosed in armatures, others assembled into hybrid figures or cut up and stuffed in suitcases and backpacks...see the entire review in the print version of November's Sculpture magazine.

Danh Vo, She was more like a beauty queen from a movie scene, 2009. Mixed media, 96.5 x 54.5 cm.

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