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October 2018
Vol. 37 No. 8

A publication of the
International Sculpture Center
Helsinki: Adel Abidin - Ateneum Art Museum
by John Gayer
"History Wipes," a survey of Adel Abidin's recent sculpture and video, confronted unpalatable events with works that ranged from the elegiac to the distressing. Set within the stately confines of the Ateneum Art Museum, which is dedicated to historical Finnish art, the show juxtaposed the century-old Finnish Civil War with much more recent happenings in the Middle East, blending personal experience with echoes of notable art historical antecedents. The idea of cleansing featured prominently, and Abidin tackled this issue from multiple angles. An unexpected humorous streak, though sporadic, tempered some of the most appalling scenarios with pathetic ridiculousness. ...see the entire review in the print version of October's Sculpture magazine.

Adel Abidin, Relics, #9, 2017. Mixed media on PVC foam, 50 x 39 cm.
San Francisco: Toshiaki Noda - Patricia Sweetow Gallery
by Daneva H. Dansby
Toshiaki
Noda, TN221, 2017. Glazed ceramic,
16 x 11.5 x 11 in. Toshiaki Noda's clay sculptures present themselves as decorative yet functional works melded back into, or partially emerged from, their organic state. Smashed cans and vessels, egg cartons, and flattened stubs ooze and bubble, as they fold and collapse into themselves. The sculptures traverse a range of glazes and colors, some matte, others glossy. The impression is both familiar (domestic objects in pleasing hues) and disconcerting (like the remnants of a home pulled from the ashes of a fire). Several of the works incarnate their earthen source, shaped like confused rocks or podgy tree stumps, stilled in their effort to achieve form. It is as if Noda is attempting to capture time, solidified in the act of transformative heat, from past to present and back again...see the entire review in the print version of October's Sculpture magazine.

Toshiaki Noda, TN221, 2017. Glazed ceramic, 16 x 11.5 x 11 in.
New York: Terry Adkins - Lévy Gorvy Gallery
by Kay Whitney
Terry Adkins, Shenandoah,
1998. Concrete, steel, rope, and silicone,
47 x 55.9 x 76.2 cm.The work of Terry Adkins, who died in 2014, is nothing less than visually embodied philosophy--it conjoins the poetic and the political in objects that fuse the aural with the visible. His astonishing originality escapes the well-established tropes of sound sculpture by rejecting John Cage, electronica, musique concrete, and other manifestations of sound art in favor of an improvisatory eclec - ticism that borrows aspects of Modernism but is deeply rooted in African traditions. Adkins's sculptures--an evocative range of found and assembled objects made into immense, carefully wrought musical instruments-- create historical connections that resonate with the murderous present. Many of his works reference historical figures and act as monuments to the African and African American past...see the entire review in the print version of October's Sculpture magazine.

Terry Adkins, Shenandoah, 1998. Concrete, steel, rope, and silicone, 47 x 55.9 x 76.2 cm.
New York: Huma Bhabha - Metropolitan Museum of Art
by Joyce Beckenstein
Huma Bhabha, We Come
in Peace, 2018. Bronze, 2 views
of installation at the Metropolitan
Museum of Art.In We Come in Peace, Huma Bhabha's Cantor Roof commission for the Met (on view through October 28, 2018), a monumental figure stands 12 feet tall, its five-sided head staring in all directions. The giant's hands and feet, long hair, and big ears seem gender-neutral, but pointed breasts signal female and a big bulge below the waist could indicate male. The all-seeing one's body is black from the hips down, turquoise up to the neck, and pinkish-gray on top. Its various markings include star-like scarification on the breasts, pink dots on the buttocks, scars up and down its back and arms, a five-sided blue star tattoo on its left hip, and colorful scratches on the legs and arms. The figure faces north as humans of all ages wander freely across the roof taking selfies...see the entire review in the print version of October's Sculpture magazine.

Huma Bhabha, We Come in Peace, 2018. Bronze, 2 views of installation at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
New York: Ranjani Shettar - Metropolitan Museum of Art
by Jonathan Goodman
Ranjani Shettar, Seven ponds and a
few raindrops, 2017. Stainless steel,
muslin, and tamarind dyeThough Ranjani Shettar, who turned 40 last year, is a mid-career artist (at least by Western standards), her work remains youthfully lyrical, and close to nature in ways that evade her closest American counterpart Sarah Sze, whose work is busier and more mechanical. Shettar's impulse feels conservationist and ecologically oriented, but it also responds to the works of Sze and Teresita Fernández. Shettar's use of materials in Seven ponds and a few raindrops (2017), her recent Met installation, is deliberately earthy, as captured in the descriptive title. Seven earthand copper-colored amoeba-like forms, made from stainless steel covered in tamarind-stained muslin, hung from the ceiling Constructed in two layers--the top perforated with open circles underlain by a flat, ground-like terrain--the ponds cast shifting shadows around the space. Leaf- or raindrop-like extensions made their way slightly beyond these supports--lighter, more earthcolored attachments drawn out from the open upper level, and darker, cupped ovals moving outward from the solid planes beneath them...see the entire review in the print version of October's Sculpture magazine.

Ranjani Shettar, Seven ponds and a few raindrops, 2017. Stainless steel, muslin, and tamarind dye.
Philadelphia: "Individual Gravities" - Tiger Strikes Asteroid
by Samantha Mitchell
Elana
Herzog, Untitled (Noresund/
New York), 2017."Individual Gravities," an exhibition at the artist-run space Tiger Strikes Asteroid, featured new work in sculpture by Alexis Granwell, Elana Herzog, and Trish Tillman. All three artists investigate the visual culture of undoing, literally and abstractly. They gesture toward various slowly evolved design traditions through the language of their demise, gently breaking them open by offering images of potential ruin or re-conception. This forms part of what curator Alex Ebstein refers to as a shared commitment to the practice of focused creation; in her exhibition essay, she describes a ponderous, experimental, material-based practice that defies today's fast-paced, information-seeking world. Focusing on a methodical approach serves as a kind of anticapitalist reclaiming of process and space, "communicating alternative relationships to mainstream structures." Granwell, Herzog, and Tillman draw from sewing, papermaking, and painting...see the entire review in the print version of October's Sculpture magazine.

Elana Herzog, Untitled (Noresund/ New York), 2017.
Salt Lake City: Frank McEntire - Nox Contemporary
by Alexandra Karl
Frank McEntire, Rapid
Response, 2018. Mixed media, 85 x
37 in.Car crashes and forest fires, school shootings and terrorist attacks all make our world more violent. As such events continue to increase, we will need tools to comprehend and mourn such events. The works collected in Frank McEntire's recent exhibition "First Response," which honored the servicemen and women who yank us from harm's way and pry us from the wreckage, offer some possibilities. McEntire combines the emergency equipment used by these professionals with other found objects to form assemblages that blend the reverent with the didactic. We come face to face with fireproof coveralls and hardhats, wye valves and battering rams, crowbars and crane hooks. Bringing these objects into a gallery is not without its com - plexities On one hand, getting close and personal with used rescue equipment is unsettling. Breath, for instance, displays a spent oxygen tank within a Plexiglas case. With the mouthpiece lying limp beside the tank, one can't help imagining it being used by someone gasping for air. Nicks and scuffs bear witness to a real world of danger, not the dramatized scenarios on our television screens...see the entire review in the print version of October's Sculpture magazine.

Frank McEntire, Rapid Response, 2018. Mixed media, 85 x 37 in.
Rotterdam: Dineo Seshee Bopape - Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art
by Robert Preece

Dineo Seshee Bopape, Lerole: footnotes
(The struggle of memory
against forgetting), 2017–18.Lerole: footnotes (The struggle of memory against forgetting), a recent large-scale installation by South African artist Dineo Seshee Bopape, combined visceral materiality with historical accounts of precolonial revolts across the African continent to voice centuries of resistance against European invasion. Lerole, which means "active dust," signals a spirit of agency, of doing across history. For Bopape, that agency is rooted in the soil and the human ability to shape it. Stacked bricks arranged into different forms directed the pathways of the instal - lation, which resembled a memorial, a garden, and an abstract landscape. Six turntables filled the space with the calls of the quetzal bird. Bopape chose the bird, even though it is native to South America, because it is "mythologically known as the bird that commits suicide when held in captivity."...see the entire review in the print version of October's Sculpture magazine.

Dineo Seshee Bopape, Lerole: footnotes (The struggle of memory against forgetting), 2017–18.

DISPATCH: Rebecca Belmore at Landmarks 2017
by Basia Sliwinska
Wave
Sound, 2017. Cast aluminum, detail
of work installed at Wave Sound,
Pukaskwa National Park, Canada.The journey to Rebecca Belmore's Wave Sound in Banff National Park in Alberta required considerable effort. Located on a promontory called Centre Point on the shores of Lake Minnewanka, a cerulean blue glacial lake flanked by tall subalpine mountains, the work was more than two hours from the nearest city. A winding road on the last leg of the trip brought intrepid viewers closer to the land with each passing kilometer. The Banff sculpture was just one of four Wave Sound works that Belmore created for LandMarks 2017 in celebration of Canada's 150- year anniversary; the others were located in Pukaskwa National Park and Georgian Bay Islands National Park (Ontario) and in Gros Morne National Park (Newfoundland). (Three Wave Sound works are currently on view at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto.)..see the entire review in the print version of October's Sculpture magazine.

Wave Sound, 2017. Cast aluminum, detail of work installed at Wave Sound, Pukaskwa National Park, Canada.


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